Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
Visit old site
Home Print this page Email this page Small font size Default font size Increase font size
Users Online: 414
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 238-241

The prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral infections among pregnant women


1 Department of Hematology & Blood transfusion, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Microbiology, Central Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria
3 Department of Medical Microbiology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria
4 Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ose Ugbebor
Department of Hematology & Blood transfusion, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Background : Viral hepatitis during pregnancy is associated with high risk of maternal complications and has become a leading cause of foetal death. Aims : This study aimed at determining the prevalence of hepatitis B and C viral infections among pregnant women attending the antenatal clinic of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital. Patients and Methods: This was a hospital based cross-sectional study that included 5760 pregnant women who attended the antenatal clinic of the hospital during the periods of October 2009 - October 2010. Relevant data was gathered and women having history of previous liver diseases, diabetes and pre-eclamptic toxemia were excluded from the study. Rapid diagnostic test kits were used to screen for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies. Results : 720 (12.5%) and 206 (3.6%) out of 5,760 pregnant women included in the study were found to be positive for Serum antibodies to hepatitis B and C respectively. 33 (0.57%) were found to have mixed infections of hepatitis B and C. None of the expected risk factors had significant outcome. Conclusion : This study showed that the prevalence of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) among pregnant women in this study area is of intermediate endemicity (12.5%).


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2030    
    Printed77    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded489    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 4    

Recommend this journal