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CASE REPORT
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 666-668

Gastrointestinal Kaposi's sarcoma presenting as ileocolic intussusception


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Trinitas Regional Medical Center, Seton Hall University Health and Medical Sciences, Elizabeth, New Jersey, USA
2 Department of Hospital Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA

Correspondence Address:
Khaldoon Shaheen
Department of Hospital Medicine, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Institute of Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue A13, Cleveland, Ohio
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-2714.122313

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Context: Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common neoplasm in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement with KS commonly occurs in association with cutaneous lesions or lymph node involvement, with GI tract involvement alone occurring in only 3.5% of cases. There are several case reports described in the literature about asymptomatic intestinal KS with skin manifestations. Although GI KS is usually asymptomatic, hemorrhages from the oral cavity, esophagus, stomach, and large bowel have been reported in this disease. Case Report: Our case is unique, in a way that the patient does not have skin manifestation, and also is that the first manifestation presented as acute intestinal intussusception and obstruction with nodular mass lesions of the stomach and GI tract due to GI KS. Conclusion: As a differential diagnosis of KS, nonHodgkin lymphomas frequently involve the gut in AIDS patients. Furthermore, tumors of the gut with spindle-shaped cells such as leiomyomas, rhabdomyosarcomas, high-grade pleomorphic sarcomas, or GI stromal tumors have to be considered in the differential diagnosis. Overall, the visceral involvement of the KS is usually associated with poor prognosis. Our case illustrates the importance of physicians to recognize GI KS as a differential diagnosis for HIV positive patients with recurrent abdominal pain. It is commonly occurs in association with cutaneous lesions or lymph node involvement and rarely presents with GI involvement alone, which is makes it a challenge to the physician.


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