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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 575-579

Association between fecal incontinence and objectively measured physical activity in U.S. adults


1 Center for Health Behavior Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi, USA
2 Section of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, USA

Correspondence Address:
Paul D Loprinzi
Center for Health Behavior Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, University, MS, 38677
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-2714.145473

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Background: Brisk physical activity may facilitate fecal incontinence due to physical activity-induced colonic motility. However, there currently are no studies that have examined the relationship between fecal incontinence and free-living physical activity behavior. Aim: Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between fecal incontinence and objectively measured physical activity among adults. Materials and Methods: A national sample of adults in the United States (n = 2565, 20-85 years) completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for a week to objectively measure physical activity behavior. Results: After adjustments, fecal incontinence was positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (β = 0.85, P = 0.04), suggesting that lower perceived severity of fecal incontinence was associated with greater engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Fecal incontinence was not significantly associated with light-intensity physical activity (P = 0.27). Conclusion: Our results suggest that adults in the United States with greater perceived severity of fecal incontinence engage in less moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; however, those with greater severity of fecal incontinence do not appear to have different levels of light-intensity physical activity behavior. Given the emerging research showing beneficial effects of light-intensity physical activity, health care professionals should encourage light-intensity physical activity to their patients with fecal incontinence.


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