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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 7  |  Page : 295-301

The "Fit but Fat" paradigm addressed using accelerometer-determined physical activity data


1 Department of Exercise Science, Donna and Allan Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Bellarmine University, Louisville, Kentucky, Korea
2 School of Biological and Population Health Sciences, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Korea
3 Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sangmyung University, Seoul, Korea
4 School of Community Health, Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, Canada
5 Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
6 Departments of Exercise Science and Epidemiology/Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA

Correspondence Address:
Paul Loprinzi
Department of Exercise Science, Donna and Allan Lansing School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Bellarmine University, Louisville, Kentucky 40205, USA

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-2714.136901

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Background: No studies have addressed the "fit but fat" paradigm using accelerometry data. Aim: The study was to determine if 1) higher levels of accelerometer-determined physical activity are favorably associated with biomarkers in overweight or obese persons (objective 1); and 2) overweight or obese individuals who are sufficiently active have better or similar biomarker levels than normal weight persons who are not sufficiently active (objective 2). Materials and Methods: Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed and included 5,146 participants aged 20-85 years. Results: Regarding objective 1, obese active individuals had more favorable waist circumference, C-reactive protein, white blood cells, and neutrophil levels when compared to obese inactive individuals; similar results were found for overweight adults. Regarding objective 2, there were no significant differences between normal weight inactive individuals and overweight active individuals for nearly all biomarkers. Similarly, there were no significant differences between normal weight inactive individuals and obese active individuals for white blood cells, neutrophils, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, or homocysteine. Conclusions: Physical activity has a protective effect on biomarkers in normal, overweight, and obese individuals, and overweight (not obese) active individuals have a similar cardiovascular profile than normal weight inactive individuals.


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