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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 151-159

The predisposing factors between dental caries and deviations from normal weight


1 Senior Lecturer, Public Health Dentistry, National Dental College and Hospital, Dera Bassi, Punjab, India
2 Professor, Public Health Dentistry, Swami Devi Dyal Hospital and Dental College, Panchkula, Haryana, India
3 Head of department and Professor, Public Health Dentistry, Swami Devi Dyal Hospital and Dental College, Panchkula, Haryana, India
4 Senior Lecturer, Public Health Dentistry, H.P. Government Dental College and Hospital, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India
5 Senior Lecturer, Public Health Dentistry, Teerthankar Mahaveer Dental College, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amandeep Chopra
Department of Public Health Dentistry, National Dental College and Hospital, Dera Bassi - 140 507, Punjab
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-2714.156011

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Background: Dental caries and deviations from normal weight are two conditions which share several broadly predisposing factors. So it's important to understand any relationship between dental state and body weight if either is to be managed appropriately. Aims: The study was done to find out the correlation between body mass index (BMI), diet, and dental caries among 12-15-year-old schoolgoing children in Panchkula District. Materials and Methods: A multistage sample of 12-15-year-old school children (n = 810) in Panchkula district, Haryana was considered. Child demographic details and diet history for 5 days was recorded. Data regarding dental caries status was collected using World Health Organization (1997) format. BMI was calculated and categorized according to the World Health Organization classification system for BMI. The data were subjected to statistical analysis using chi-square test and binomial regression developed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) 20.0. Results: The mean Decayed Missing Filled Teeth (DMFT) score was found to be 1.72 with decayed, missing, and filled teeth to be 1.22, 0.04, and 0.44, respectively. When the sample was assessed based on type of diet, it was found that vegetarians had higher mean DMFT (1.72) as compared to children having mixed diet. Overweight children had highest DMFT (3.21) which was followed by underweight (2.31) and obese children (2.23). Binomial regression revealed that females were 1.293 times at risk of developing caries as compared to males. Fair and poor Simplified-Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S) showed 3.920 and 4.297 times risk of developing caries as compared to good oral hygiene, respectively. Upper high socioeconomic status (SES) is at most risk of developing caries. Underweight, overweight, and obese are at 2.7, 2.5, and 3 times risk of developing caries as compared to children with normal BMI, respectively. Conclusion: Dental caries and deviations from normal weight are two conditions which share several broadly predisposing factors such as diet, SES, lifestyle and other environmental factors.


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