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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 176-188

Tumor-suppressor genes, cell cycle regulatory checkpoints, and the skin


1 Department of Immunodermatopathology, Georgia Dermatopathology Associates, Atlanta, Georgia, USA
2 Department of Dermatopathology, Georgia Dermatopathology Associates, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Correspondence Address:
Ana Maria Abreu Velez
Georgia Dermatopathology Associates, 1534 North Decatur Road, NE, Suite 206, Atlanta - 30307-1000, Georgia
USA
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Source of Support: Georgia Dermatopathology Associates, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (MSH, AMAV)., Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-2714.157476

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The cell cycle (or cell-division cycle) is a series of events that take place in a cell, leading to its division and duplication. Cell division requires cell cycle checkpoints (CPs) that are used by the cell to both monitor and regulate the progress of the cell cycle. Tumor-suppressor genes (TSGs) or antioncogenes are genes that protect the cell from a single event or multiple events leading to cancer. When these genes mutate, the cell can progress to a cancerous state. We aimed to perform a narrative review, based on evaluation of the manuscripts published in MEDLINE-indexed journals using the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms "tumor suppressor's genes," "skin," and "cell cycle regulatory checkpoints." We aimed to review the current concepts regarding TSGs, CPs, and their association with selected cutaneous diseases. It is important to take into account that in some cell cycle disorders, multiple genetic abnormalities may occur simultaneously. These abnormalities may include intrachromosomal insertions, unbalanced division products, recombinations, reciprocal deletions, and/or duplication of the inserted segments or genes; thus, these presentations usually involve several genes. Due to their complexity, these disorders require specialized expertise for proper diagnosis, counseling, personal and family support, and genetic studies. Alterations in the TSGs or CP regulators may occur in many benign skin proliferative disorders, neoplastic processes, and genodermatoses.


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