North American Journal of Medical Sciences

LETTER TO EDITOR
Year
: 2013  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 249--250

Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practice in health care delivery


Sunil Raina 
 Department of Community Medicine, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College Tanda, Himachal Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Sunil Raina
Department of Community Medicine, Dr. Rajendra Prasad Government Medical College Tanda, Himachal Pradesh
India




How to cite this article:
Raina S. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practice in health care delivery.North Am J Med Sci 2013;5:249-250


How to cite this URL:
Raina S. Assessment of knowledge, attitude, and practice in health care delivery. North Am J Med Sci [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Dec 14 ];5:249-250
Available from: http://www.najms.org/text.asp?2013/5/3/249/109226


Full Text

Dear Editor,

I went through an article entitled "Knowledge and attitude of medical undergraduate, interns and postgraduate students in India towards emergency contraception", published recently in the North American Journal of Medical Sciences. [1] The article derives its strength from the fact that ultimately, it is this study population which has a role to play in emergency contraception. KAP comprises of three components-knowledge, attitude, and practice. These types of studies are a good way to assess health care delivery. KAP studies are easy to conduct, measurable, and easily interpretable. This makes these studies a useful survey methodology. Most of the KAP studies lack in measuring attitude properly (the second part of a standard KAP survey questionnaire). [2] It is here that this study suffers too. Attitudes are acquired characteristics of an individual. Attitude includes three components: (a) A cognitive or knowledge element (b) an affective or feeling element, and (c) a tendency to action. [3] Attitude has been defined as a relatively enduring organization of beliefs around an object, subject, or concept which predisposes one to respond in some preferential manner. The authors have done a nice work while dealing with the feeling element of the attitude, but have handled "tendency to action" inadequately. The focus in attitude evaluation has to be the study participant and not someone else. In question number one of the attitude component [Table 1], the focus is on paramedical staff. The other three questions really focus on knowledge, and not on attitude. [1] The attitude part could have been constructed as follows:{Table 1}

A patient seeks consultation after unprotected sex. The target attitude for health care professionals in this situation should be providing emergency contraception. The scale should read as:

[INLINE:1]

 Scoring



Recode the items that have negatively worded endpoints on the right, so that higher numbers then always reflect a positive attitude to the target behavior (e.g., for 'pleasant-unpleasant', an answer of 6 becomes score of 2; a score of 4 remains a 4.

References

1Giri PA, Bangal VB, Phalke DB. Knowledge and attitude of medical undergraduate, interns and postgraduate students in India towards emergency contraception. N Am J Med Sci 2013;5:37-40.
2Launiala A. How much can a KAP survey tell us about people›s knowledge, attitudes and practices? Some observations from medical anthropology research on malaria in pregnancy in Malawi. Anthropol Matters 2009;11.
3Park K. Medicine and Social Sciences. Park's Textbook of Preventive and Social Medicine. 21 st ed. Jabalpur: M/s Banarsidas Bhanot; 2011. p. 626.