North American Journal of Medical Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 11  |  Page : 575--579

Association between fecal incontinence and objectively measured physical activity in U.S. adults


Paul D Loprinzi1, Satish S Rao2 
1 Center for Health Behavior Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi, USA
2 Section of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, Georgia, USA

Correspondence Address:
Paul D Loprinzi
Center for Health Behavior Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science, and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, University, MS, 38677
USA

Background: Brisk physical activity may facilitate fecal incontinence due to physical activity-induced colonic motility. However, there currently are no studies that have examined the relationship between fecal incontinence and free-living physical activity behavior. Aim: Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the association between fecal incontinence and objectively measured physical activity among adults. Materials and Methods: A national sample of adults in the United States (n = 2565, 20-85 years) completed the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index questionnaire and wore an accelerometer for a week to objectively measure physical activity behavior. Results: After adjustments, fecal incontinence was positively associated with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (β = 0.85, P = 0.04), suggesting that lower perceived severity of fecal incontinence was associated with greater engagement in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Fecal incontinence was not significantly associated with light-intensity physical activity (P = 0.27). Conclusion: Our results suggest that adults in the United States with greater perceived severity of fecal incontinence engage in less moderate-to-vigorous physical activity; however, those with greater severity of fecal incontinence do not appear to have different levels of light-intensity physical activity behavior. Given the emerging research showing beneficial effects of light-intensity physical activity, health care professionals should encourage light-intensity physical activity to their patients with fecal incontinence.


How to cite this article:
Loprinzi PD, Rao SS. Association between fecal incontinence and objectively measured physical activity in U.S. adults.North Am J Med Sci 2014;6:575-579


How to cite this URL:
Loprinzi PD, Rao SS. Association between fecal incontinence and objectively measured physical activity in U.S. adults. North Am J Med Sci [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 Oct 23 ];6:575-579
Available from: http://www.najms.org/article.asp?issn=1947-2714;year=2014;volume=6;issue=11;spage=575;epage=579;aulast=Loprinzi;type=0