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CASE REPORT
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 178-180

Ventricular standstill: An uncommon electrophysiological abnormality caused by profound vagal tone


Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Nuclear Cardiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham Health Center Montgomery, Montgomery, Alabama 36116, USA

Correspondence Address:
Shikha Jaiswal
2055, East S Blvd, Suite 200, Montgomery, Alabama - 36116
USA
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1947-2714.131245

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Context : Ventricular standstill (VS) is an uncommon electrophysiological phenomenon and usually manifests as syncope. Rarely has a case been reported where the patient has been totally asymptomatic, and it has resolved spontaneously. Case Report : We report a case of complete VS and high-degree atrioventricular (AV) block in a 50-year-old female, who was admitted for nausea, vomiting, and chest pain. The patient never had a syncopal episode, even though she was in VS for more than 10 s. Conclusion : Such degree of conduction abnormality without any syncope has not been reported so far. Her electrophysiological abnormality was attributed to profound vagotonic effect and was treated with a permanent pacemaker.


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