North American Journal of Medical Sciences

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2014  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 145--151

Slow yogic breathing through right and left nostril influences sympathovagal balance, heart rate variability, and cardiovascular risks in young adults


Gopal Krushna Pal1, Ankit Agarwal2, Shanmugavel Karthik1, Pravati Pal1, Nivedita Nanda3 
1 Department of Physiology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India
2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India
3 Department of Biochemistry, Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research (JIPMER), Pondicherry, India

Correspondence Address:
Gopal Krushna Pal
Department of Physiology, JIPMER, Programme Director, Advance Center for Yoga, JIPMER, Pondicherry - 605 006
India

Background: Specific nostril breathing is known to influence autonomic functions. Aim: The study was to assess the effects of right nostril breathing (RNB) and left nostril breathing (LNB) on heart rate variability (HRV) and cardiovascular functions. Material and Methods: Eighty-five student volunteers were divided into three groups: RNB group (n = 30), LNB group (n = 30), and control group (n = 25). RNB and LNB group subjects practiced right and left nostril breathing, respectively, every day 1 h for 6 weeks. The control group did not practice nostril breathing. Cardiovascular parameters and spectral indices of HRV were recorded before and after 6-week practice of nostril breathing. In RNB and LNB groups, prediction of rate-pressure product (RPP) by low-frequency to high-frequency ratio (LF-HF) of HRV was assessed by bivariate logistic regression. Results: HRV indices representing sympathetic activity were increased in the RNB group and indices representing parasympathetic activity were increased in LNB group following 6-week nostril breathing. Prediction of LF-HF to RPP, the marker of cardiovascular risks, was more significant (OR 2.65, P = 0.005) in the LNB group compared to the RNB group (OR 1.452, P = 0.016). Conclusions: Short-term practice of LNB improves vagal tone, increases HRV, and promotes cardiovascular health of medical students. Practice of RNB increases sympathetic tone and could jeopardize cardiovascular health.


How to cite this article:
Pal GK, Agarwal A, Karthik S, Pal P, Nanda N. Slow yogic breathing through right and left nostril influences sympathovagal balance, heart rate variability, and cardiovascular risks in young adults.North Am J Med Sci 2014;6:145-151


How to cite this URL:
Pal GK, Agarwal A, Karthik S, Pal P, Nanda N. Slow yogic breathing through right and left nostril influences sympathovagal balance, heart rate variability, and cardiovascular risks in young adults. North Am J Med Sci [serial online] 2014 [cited 2021 Oct 20 ];6:145-151
Available from: https://www.najms.org/article.asp?issn=1947-2714;year=2014;volume=6;issue=3;spage=145;epage=151;aulast=Pal;type=0